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A Lot Of Adult Americans Believe Chocolate Milk Comes from Brown Cows, Like Seriously!

A Lot Of Adult Americans Believe Chocolate Milk Comes from Brown Cows, Like Seriously!

The finding came from a study conducted by the Innovation Centre of US Dairy. Another 48 percent of people surveyed said they didn’t know where chocolate milk came from.

Since its invention, chocolate milk has gone on to become one of the most popular drinks in the world. There have been disputes as to who first invented it - most people credit it to an Irish physician and collector, Hans Sloane, said to have invented the drink in the 1700s. However, recent evidence suggests that the Jamaicans were drinking chocolate milk for ages before that.  Its inventor aside, there are very few people in the world who probably dislike the drink. The Americans on their part are crazy for chocolate milk, but it appears that many of them do not actually know how it is made.  In fact, nearly 7 percent of the population in US believe that chocolate milk "comes from brown cows," as reported in Today.com. You heard that right! How they came to this conclusion is anybody's guess. Do they think these brown cows are the same ones that also produce the cocoa and the sugar? It is rather tragic to think that people do not know how and where their food comes from and the disconnect between farm and table. 



 

 

The  Innovation Centre of US Dairy conducted the study resulting in this number. Additionally, they noted that the 7 percent, of a sample size of 1000 people, did not include children. One could be forgiven for the error if they were a child, chalking it up to creativity.



 

 

What's even worse is that a whopping 48 percent of people said they didn’t know where chocolate milk came from.  So beloved is chocolate milk that another 29 percent of people who were surveyed used their children as an excuse to buy the drink for themselves, according to the study. The report further stated that the topic of people not knowing where chocolate milk comes from was covered on the 'facts and myths section' of the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy's site.



 

 

The site further clarified, "Chocolate milk — or any flavored milk for that matter — is white cow’s milk with added flavoring and sweeteners." Since the story was published, people on social media have not stopped poking fun at what they call "the failing level of intelligence of the American population." In line with this, Jeff Doolittle wrote on his Twitter account: ‏ To be fair, if I was taking a survey and the question was “do you think chocolate milk comes from brown cows?” I would smash the yes button so hard.



 

 

Jeremy Gardner‏, another Twitter user, even went to the extent of saying that the survey was a perfect way of understanding the country. He wrote: If you want to understand this country in the context of one survey: 7% of American adults believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows. Another Twitter user expressed his anguish at the enormity of the sample size of the people. Gordon Shumay wrote:  We can start with the basics: A survey from the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy found that 7% of American adults think chocolate milk comes from brown cows. That’s, like 17 million Americans 



 

 

It didn't take long for this statistic to turn political. One Facebook user, Michael John Scott user wrote: It's hard to understand why so many people support an idiot such as Donald Trump. I submit those who do think chocolate milk comes from brown cows. A survey from the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy found that 7% of American adults think chocolate milk comes from brown cows. And if that percentage sounds small enough to be reasonable, hang onto your hats: 7% of American adults is about 17.3 million people.  



 

 

According to the Independent article, this isn't the first study to reach such a worrying conclusion though.  Previous studies have found that nearly one in five Americans do not know that hamburgers are made from beef. Cecily Upton, co-founder of the nonprofit FoodCorps, which brings agricultural and nutrition education into elementary schools, said, “At the end of the day, it’s an exposure issue.”  



 

 

She added, “Right now, we’re conditioned to think that if you need food, you go to the store. Nothing in our educational framework teaches kids where food comes from before that point. And apparently some people don’t feel any huge need to find out either. We still get kids who are surprised that a French fry comes from a potato, or that a pickle is a cucumber. Knowledge is power. Without it, we can’t make informed decisions."

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