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Egypt Holds Huge Parade For Mummified Pharaohs As They Move To A New Home

Egypt Holds Huge Parade For Mummified Pharaohs As They Move To A New Home

These majestic royals were previously residing in the Egyptian Museum overlooking Tahrir Square right in the center of the city.

The ancient mummies are on the move and it's causing quite a stir in their ancestral homeland of Egypt. The nation's government recently held a giant parade in the capital city of Cairo to transport 22 royal mummies to a new museum. These majestic royals were previously residing in the Egyptian Museum overlooking Tahrir Square right in the center of the city. Now, their new home is going to be at the new National Museum of Egyptian Civilization, which is about 3 miles south of their previous residence, NY Daily News reports. 



 

 

Out of the 22 mummies that were present, 18 of them were actual pharaohs, and four were other royals from the New Kingdom. This is the time period of the Ancient Egyptian civilization between 1539 B.C to 1075 B.C. This group of rulers also included Ramses II, the most famous pharaoh of the New Kingdom, who ruled for 67 years and is remembered for signing the first known peace treaty. Another notable sight was Queen Hatshepsut, the nationโ€™s only woman pharaoh. โ€œThis parade is a unique global event that will not be repeated,โ€ Tourism and Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Anany said.



 

 

The entire procession took about an hour from start to finish and it was a great sight for all the onlookers. The pharaohs were travelling in vehicles that resembled the ancient boats that carried them to their tombs in a regal manner after their deaths. Also, these vehicles were heavily secured and there was quite a large crowd gathered. Egypt had recently seen a sharp decline in coronavirus cases so the authorities have eased restrictions there. The mummies' re-housing "marks the end of much work to improve their conservation and exhibition," said UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay, who was in Cairo for the parade. "This raises emotions that go much further than the mere relocation of a collection - we will see the history of Egyptian civilisation unfold before our eyes."



 

 

Pharaohs have been buried in the Valley of Kings since nearly 3,000 years ago. The site is located about 400 miles south in the ancient capital of Thebes, now Luxor. They were spotted in two distinct archaeological digs at separate locations in 1881 and 1898 and then transported up the Nile to Cairo. The glory of the pharaohs is legendary, as they had a status that would be considered higher than kings, and closer to God even. After their deaths, they would be buried with tremendous amounts of riches, food, drink, and even slaves as the Egyptians had a strong belief in the afterlife. 



 

 

The Ancient Egyptians used complicated mummification techniques to preserve the pharaohs through the centuries. For one thing, they would be placed in special nitrogen-filled boxes that completely negate external conditions. It's quite amazing that they had access to such technology so long ago, and it adds even more mystery to the already-obscure Egyptian religion and culture. "The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities has done its best to make sure that the mummies have been stabilised, conserved, and are packed in a climate-controlled environment," said Salima Ikram, professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo.

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