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Exercise Is More Important To Your Happiness Than Money, Reveals Study

Exercise Is More Important To Your Happiness Than Money, Reveals Study

The researchers had collected data about the physical behavior and mental mood of over 1.2 million Americans and have some interesting revelations about exercise.

Try breaking a sweat because science has just proved that it is your key to happiness. And that's not all. It even makes you happier than money. Yes, you read that right and you know who agrees with that? Scientists from Yale from Oxford University!  

Well as we all know, exercise does have its own benefits, be it physical or mental, but a recent study has now proved it is more important to your mental health than your economic status, reported Entrepreneur.  

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Exercising surely provides a lot of benefits to your health. It can relieve stress, boost your brain functions, fill you with energy, more blood and oxygen gets pumped into your heart, help you sleep peacefully, and even reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, among many other medical benefits.

The new research was conducted by scientists at Yale and Oxford and it was published in The Lancet. The researchers had collected data about the physical behavior and mental mood of over 1.2 million Americans.

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"Exercise is known to be associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes, but its association with mental health remains unclear. We aimed to examine the association between exercise and mental health burden in a large sample and to better understand the influence of exercise type, frequency, duration, and intensity," the background of the study revealed. 

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"How many times have you felt mentally unwell in the past 30 days, for example, due to stress, depression, or emotional problems?" This was one of the questions that the participants were asked to answer. Other questions included about their income and physical activities.

The participants had over 75 options to choose for the physical activity -- this included lawn-mowing, running, childcare, housework, weight lifting, and cycling. The scientists found out that those who kept doing more physical activities were happier than those who did not. 

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In another interesting statistic, the study revealed that those who exercised regularly tended to feel bad for only around 35 days a year. While on the other hand, the non-active participants felt bad for 18 days more than them.

The researchers also found that physically active people felt as good as those who don't play sports in general but who earn around $25,000 more a year.

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However, exercising too much can also have a negative impact on your mental health. But the question is how much is too much? 
"The relationship between sport duration and mental load is U-shaped," study author Adam Chekroud of Yale University said during in an interview with Die Welt.

The research revealed that exercise is only good depending on the amount of time it is being done. Three to five training sessions each lasting between 30 to 60 minutes per week is the ideal time to do exercise, the study revealed.

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However, if you exercise more than three hours a day, your mental health might suffer more than those who weren't really physically active, the study revealed. The researchers found out that people who often did team sports, cycling, aerobic and gym activities tended to have the largest mood boosts. 

In another research that was conducted by OnePoll on behalf of fitness app Freeletics, exercising can have a lot of surprising benefits to your lifestyle, reports BestLifeOnline.

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People who often did physical activities, especially working out, tended to be happier, more optimistic, and way more sociable. The scientists found out that 40 percent of people who don’t work out said that they’d prefer staying home than going out on a Saturday night.

“If we look more closely at the mental effects that fitness has, we can even see that those who exercise regularly were also more likely to rate their own happiness level a 10 out of 10 than those who don’t exercise. This truly underlines the fact that the positive effects of exercise go far beyond the purely physical aspects many focus on,” Daniel Sobhani, CEO of Freeletics, said in a statement.

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