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Iceland Holds Funeral For Losing Its First Glacier To Climate Change: 'This Is A Warning'

Iceland Holds Funeral For Losing Its First Glacier To Climate Change: 'This Is A Warning'

It gets worse as scientists have claimed that this might be the beginning and there could be hundreds of other ice sheets that could face the same fate.

At a time when it is the need of the hour to tackle climate change, although some still believe it is not real, what is happening around us makes it all the more evident on what's to come. There are plastics thrown all around, rivers and seas are getting polluted, people are chopping off trees for their own good; long story short, if we don't take care of our nature, it might just spell doom for humanity.  

 



 

 

And Iceland is now on the receiving end of what could happen if we don't tackle climate change soon. The Nordic island nation has now marked its first-ever loss of a glacier all because of climate change. And it gets worse -- scientists have claimed that this might be the beginning and there could be hundreds of other ice sheets that could face the same fate. 

 



 

 

It all happened at Okjökull glacier which lost its glacier status in 2014 and now, people have mounted a bronze plaque on a bare rock in what is now being called a funeral ceremony. It was unveiled in July and includes text in both Icelandic and English. This plaque is said to be the first monument to a glacier lost to climate change anywhere in the world.

“The symbolic death of a glacier is a warning to us, and we need action,” former Irish president Mary Robinson was quoted as saying by Independent. “I hope this ceremony will be an inspiration not only to us here in Iceland but also for the rest of the world because what we are seeing here is just one face of the climate crisis,” The Guardian quoted the Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir as saying.

 



 

 

It was attended by over 100 people as they made their way up the mountain, along with the Iceland Prime Minister,  former UN human rights commissioner Mary Robinson, and local researchers. 

The plaque reads “A letter to the future” and it describes what climate change can do to humanity in the coming future. “In the next 200 years, all our glaciers are expected to follow the same path. This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. Only you know if we did it.”

 



 

 

According to an AP report, the now-gone glacier was even issued a death certificate. During the ceremony, many children also laid a plaque while paying tribute to the glacier. One among the hundreds who attended the ceremony was Julien Weiss, an aerodynamics professor at the University of Berlin. He was extremely concerned about what is going to happen in the future. “Seeing a glacier disappear is something you can feel, you can understand it and it’s pretty visual,” he said. “You don’t feel climate change daily, it’s something that happens very slowly on a human scale, but very quickly on a geological scale.”

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