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Listening To Christmas Music Could Be Bad For Your Mental Health, Says Psychologist

Listening To Christmas Music Could Be Bad For Your Mental Health, Says Psychologist

Overdosing on Christmas songs is not necessarily going to make you jolly. In fact, it might have a negative impact on your mental health, claims clinical psychologist Linda Blair.

As Christmas is fast approaching, all the lovers of this festive season are dusting off their old Christmas records and making them ready to be played on a loop.

But, there is news that might have made the Grinches really happy. Overdosing on Christmas songs is not necessarily going to make you jolly. In fact, it might have a negative impact on your mental health, according to a clinical psychologist.  



 

 

Christmas songs are the most loved music that anyone can listen and it does have the capability of uplifting anyone's mood. There is a reason why Mariah Carey's 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' is as popular as it is.

But after hearing out this report, you may want to dial down on the number of Christmas songs you listen to every day. 



 

 

Following psychologist Linda Blair, listening to too many Christmas songs on repeat could actually have a negative effect on your mental health. In a conversation with Sky News, Blair said, "People working in the shops at Christmas have to tune out Christmas music because if they don’t, it really does stop you from being able to focus on anything else. You’re simply spending all of your energy trying not to hear what you’re hearing.”



 

 

This might not come as a surprise knowing that listening to Christmas music on repeat is not necessarily a good idea and it hampers our concentration abilities a lot.

Research shows striking a good balance between festive smells and music can positively affect the shopping environment, making customers happier. A study dating back to 2005 indicates that when this above-stated balance is found, it encouraged people to spend more time in a shop and subsequently boosted sales. 

 



 

Blair also said that workers are more at risk of being mentally drained from listening to Christmas music and the same song being played all the time makes it hard for employees to tune it out and they are unable to focus on anything.

 

Blair added, "Christmas music is likely to irritate people if it’s played too loudly and too early." 



 

 

Another report by The Tampa Bay reported that Best Buy started playing Christmas Music from October 22, and it became the first store to stream the songs.

A few days later, other stores such as Sears, Ulta and Michaels followed suit. Danny Turner, a programming executive from Mood Media, said, "The one I have in mind is 'The 12 Days of Christmas. Once I’m on the third day, I’m counting how many days are left. You don’t want any songs that feel like they last for 12 days.”



 

 

The report also conducted a poll about the most appropriate time to start playing Christmas music and more than half the participants said it was best to begin listening to holiday music after Thanksgiving.

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