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Netflix Wants People To Stop Calling Movies 'Chick Flicks', And Twitter Can't Handle It!

Netflix Wants People To Stop Calling Movies 'Chick Flicks', And Twitter Can't Handle It!

Reactions were predictably negative from a lot of users. Some even went on to say that they were canceling their accounts while others were glad that they already did.

Remember Charlie's Angels? Mean Girls? Legally Blonde? And remember the time when you asked your guy friends to watch it, more often than not, such movies got labeled 'chick flicks' and that's the reason they didn't want to watch it? Some guys who would have even watched it may refuse to agree that they have seen the movie, solely because it comes under this umbrella of "chick flicks."

So what exactly is a "chick flick"? If common knowledge of popular culture is anything to go by, most people would agree that chick flicks are usually romantic comedies, often has a female lead and targets a predominately female audience. But to say the phrase implies that only women are interested in the genre is highly debatable, reports The Daily Caller.



 

 

And that's when Netflix decided to chime in with its take on this subject. "Quick PSA: Can we stop calling films “chick flicks” unless the films are literally about small baby chickens? Here’s why this phrase should absolutely be retired (thread)"



 

 

It added, "For starters, "chick flicks" are traditionally synonymous with romantic comedies. This suggests that women are the only people interested in 1. Romance 2. Comedy. Which I can promise from the men I’ve come across in my life – simply isn’t true." 



 

 

"The term also cheapens the work that goes into making these types of films. Romantic comedies and/or films centered around female leads go through just as much editing, consideration, and rewriting as any other film," the company posted.

"And nicknaming films "chick flicks" drives home that there’s something trivial about watching them. But what’s trivial about watching a film that makes you feel 1,000 emotions in ~90 minutes?"

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There were also many who completely understood what Netflix was trying to say and one among them was Pretty Little Liars creator I. Marlene King who said that she loved the term "chick flick" as it has been "reclaimed" as something empowering rather than an insult. 

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 "Overall, there’s nothing inherently gendered about liking a light-hearted film with a strong female lead and emotional arc. So next time you call something a "chick flick," you better be referring to Chicken Run." 

And as expected, social media users attacked the streaming platform with their comments on "chick flicks," starting a rather heated debate on Twitter. Reactions were predictably negative from a lot of users. Some even went on to say that they were canceling their accounts while others were glad that they already did. 

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"They will always be Chick-Flicks! How about this, you do away with "man-splaining" and we'll do away with "Chick-Flicks" #Equality," one Twitter user said. 

Meanwhile, another added, "Seriously, get this angry feminist off Netflix’s social media account. Starting this long ass thread over “chick flicks”. I call Seth Rogan & James Franco movies ‘“dick flicks” Seriously, first world problems much? While 5 Americans die an hour from opiate overdose [sic]"

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Now the debate is never-ending, considering how many people believe that if a movie has a female lead starring alongside other women, it's automatically implied that the film is of a lower quality than one fronted by a male. But all of this has been shattered in the recent few years, thanks to movies like Wonder Woman, Captain Marvel, Bird Box and many others which have broken many records despite not having a male lead. 

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And this disparity can be largely associated with the fact that the movie industry as a whole is still largely dominated by men. According to USC Annenberg last year,  for every female director in Hollywood, there are 22 men. And that can make it very easy for critics —and mostly male critics to write off films that center around women’s experiences.

Netflix has surely raised a serious question here, so what is your take on this? Do you think it is about time we retire the word "Chick Flicks"? 

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