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Taurid Meteor Shower To Send Fireballs Streaking Across The Night Sky This Week

Taurid Meteor Shower To Send Fireballs Streaking Across The Night Sky This Week

The Taurid meteor shower might last for about a second in the night sky, making them easier to photograph than other meteors that can literally be missed by the blink of an eye.

Most of us have only gotten a few glimpses of shooting stars over the course of our lives. Of course, there are some who take the time and prepare to view such celestial events and accompany themselves with high-tech cameras and telescopes. The upcoming Taurid Meteor Shower ought to be one to look out for... so mark your calendars!

The peak of this marvelous nightly spectacle is limited only to a few shooting stars, but these aren't like the rest by any means. They will sparkle and hurl themselves across the sky and will look like giant fireballs shooting through the blackness. They last put up a show on Earth back in 2015, but who knows, they might be even better this year.



 

 

Check out EarthSky's fantastic video and pictures capturing the 2015 Taurids Meteor Shower in all its glory! 

Watch in awe as these giant fireballs race across the inky blue-black sky with the moonlight shining on the other side. They are reportedly estimated to be traveling at speeds of up to 65,000 mph. Whew! Thank goodness they know their trajectories and don't plan on a mid-space collision. The Taurids meteors will be leaving behind glowing trails of debris that will light up the sky like the little sparkes of fireflies, glowing a luminous orange. 

CNet informed that in addition to producing bright, colorful and sometimes fragmenting fireballs, the Taurids are known for being slow-moving. They might last for up to a second in the sky, making them easier to photograph than other meteors that can literally be missed by the blink of an eye.



 

 



 

 

EarthSky also reports that both the South and North Taurids (active from late October to early December, and peaking somewhere around November 12) are long, spread-out showers with no well-defined peak.

During the peak nights for the South Taurid meteor shower, you might see as many as five meteors per hour. But The American Meteor Society explains what – in some years – can be awesome about the Taurid meteor showers: The Taurids (both branches) are rich in fireballs and are often responsible for an increased number of fireball reports from September through November. 



 

 

Okay, let's get down to brass tacks now. The annual South Taurid meteor shower has already begun in October and now, the North Taurids have kicked off as well. The exact peaks of these showers are still up for speculation, but the best time to get a glimpse of the South Taurid shower would be in the hours after midnight.

As for the North Taurids, you might witness a fireball or two whizzing by in the late hours of the night to early dawn. And again … the Taurid showers do not exhibit strong peaks. So if you’re clouded out tonight and tomorrow, no problem. Just keep watching. The two Taurid showers tend to overlap during the first few weeks in November.



 

 



 

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